Auxiliary Tank – Underbody preperation

The underbody of my land Cruiser has definitely seen better days and I’m not surprised to see the fixing point rot away. In some other Country’s the Land Cruiser 100  is equipped with a auxiliary tank and the same fixing points are used. The bolt holes are unusable which ment I had to cut the rotten material away.

dsc_8069

This must be the cheapest available weld-on nut what Toyota’s money could buy. I’m not surprised the thread was not existent.

dsc_8453

To make a strong connection I used a mild steel box section which I have welded a nut inside and bolted on to the rear underfloor panel reinforcement. This should last a long time.

 

dsc_8228

dsc_8191

Everything is painted with chassis Lack, connected and bolted up. Before fitting the tank I sprayed on some underbody and cavity wax.

dsc_8442

dsc_8447

Next step is fitting the tank.

 

Auxiliary Tank – Preparation

Finally, I have completed the refurbishment of the main fuel tank and managed to fit the tank back in place. It took me far longer as I have anticipated. Now I want to fit the auxiliary tank from Frontrunner which are made in South Africa. Frontrunner claims the tank hold 62 litres which is more than sufficient for my purpose.

The tank is much smaller than the Long Ranger which is made in Australia and hold up to 182 litres. The advantage of the smaller tank is; it is much cheaper and I can place my spare wheel back under the LC as the original layout was.

dsc_8204

The tank came with all the fittings and painted. The paint job is probably good enough for South African roads but definitely not for Europe with all the rain and road salt in the winter.

dsc_8226

I rough sanded the surface, then I slapped a couple of coats zinc primer on and after ample trying time a generously amount of black chassis paint.

dsc_8207

Finally, I covered the surface with DINITROL 3125 HS wax which can be used for surfaces and cavities. This should prolong the life of the tank significantly.

dsc_8440

 

Land Cruiser 100 fuel tank 2

I’m still waiting for the tank protector to arrive. I have now plenty time to continue on the fuel tank.  I removed all hoses and covers and have taken the sender unit out. I would aspect much more dirt on the strainer. Even the internal of the tank was pretty clean.

DSC_8314

On the next step I have spent a number of hours to clean the outside of the tank from rust. Then I sprayed a couple of layers Dinitrol RC900 rust converter on.

DSC_8339

I had a good opportunity to install the balance pipe which is required for the auxiliary Front runner tank which I planned to install very soon.  Also I have installed all the fittings for the tank and a new strainer for the pick-up pipe.

DSC_8341

After a couple of days to let the rust converter work in to the metal I have painted the outside of the tank with chassis lack a couple of times.

DSC_8436

DSC_8423

At last I have sprayed Dinitrol 3125 HS over the paint which is a corrosion prevention fluid with has an excellent film building properties on open surfaces and leaves a brown,waxy,water repellent film. This, I hope, prevent any further corrosion.

DSC_8437

 

Land Cruiser rusty frame 2

Now I have removed my fuel tank and this gives me the opportunity to clean the rust of the frame and under body. The frame looks pretty bad where the tank sits but surprisingly the underbody is in a very good condition. I used a grinder with a wire wheel to get the worsted off and the rest I have sprayed with Dinitrol  RC900 which is convenient as it comes in an aerosol can  which converts rust into a stable, black protective polymeric coating and can the painted over.

DSC_8419

DSC_8429

DSC_8433

Land Cruiser rusty frame

Now I have removed my fuel tank  and this gives me the opportunity to clean the rust of the frame and under body. The frame looks pretty bad where the tank sits but surprisingly the underbody is in a very good condition. I used a grinder with a wire wheel to get the worsted off and the rest I have sprayed with Dinitrol  RC900, which is very convenient as it comes in an aerosol can, it converts rust into a stable, black protective polymeric coating and can the painted over. Now I leave it to dry thoroughly.

DSC_8326

DSC_8342

Land Cruiser 100 Fuel Tank

Since about 3 years I’m planning to remove my diesel tank on the Land Cruiser 100 but never came around  to do it. There was always something else more important.  Now when I have taken the fuel tank out I’m glad it is done and I hope it was not too late. I’m surprised the tank is not leaking as the condition is not good.

DSC_8298

DSC_8299

The under tray or tank protector is so brittle it just has fallen appart when I have removed it. Definitely have to order a new one and new tank straps as well. Now I have to look where I get all the replacement parts.

DSC_8296

New Pedders springs installed on my Land cruiser

The other day when I had my head under the LC I noticed the left hand spring was broken.  Last year I installed new Pedders shock absorbers but never bothered to change the springs as well. The Pedders shocks are heavy duty but I’m not sure if this had anything to do with the broken spring. It seems to me not so long ago when I have installed the Old Man Emu springs but after I have checked the mileage on it, I discovered it was more then 50 000 miles. So they have not performed as badly as the LC is very often heavy laden and used offroad a lot.

DSC_8186

It did not took very long for a new set of Pedders (7845) extra heavy duty springs to arrive and with a pair of Urethane 20mm Coil Spring Insulator which fit perfectly to it.

DSC_8172

The Pedders springs are slightly higher than the OME’s and definitely stiffer but the diameter of the coil is still the same.

DSC_8175

It took a bit an effort to install the new springs as they not compress very well but eventually I have succeeded. Pedders claim this springs are suited for constantly loaded vehicles but I plan to install an auxiliary tank in the near future, this is not an issue for me as Io will have plenty extra weight on the rear axle.

DSC_8195

I hope the pedders coil springs perform so well as the OME’s. Only time will tell.