NOKIAN HAKKAPELIITTA LT2

Since I have had the Land cruiser 100, I’ve never bothered about Winter tyres. I live in a country where it is debatable to buy some, as wintery conditions are seldom therefore making it difficult to justify the purchase. The LC is not my main transport and on bad weather it can stay on the drive.

All the previous years when I travelled to the Alps in the winter, I was more than happy with the BFGoodrich in the snow. It seems, there is now not the amount of snow on the roads as many years ago and for 2 weeks it is just not worth.

I am planning to drive to the Alps at the end of the month; I will be travelling through mountain passes where winter tyres (and snow chains) will be needed.

I have purchased a set of Nokian Hakkapeliitta LT2 on original Toyota steel rims which  makes my life much easier when I change them over.

It will be interesting to see how the winter tyres compare to the BFGoodrich that I used previously.

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I have raised the pressures in the tyres from 35 to 42 psi. Lets see if it makes a difference on the road handling

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I like the way how Nokian put the safety indicators on the centre surface of the tyre. The numbers wear out as the tire wears down. Less the 40% the tyre should not be worn in wintery conditions.

Auxiliary Tank – completion

Finally I have finished the auxiliary tank. Frontrunner claim it takes 6 hours to complete the task, it has taken longer then i thought. Then again my extra paint jobs and the preparation took a lot of time. It was fairly easy to lift the tank in to the prepared brackets  and bolting it up. It was also easy  to install the spare wheel carrier it was a very tight fit needless to say.

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I had great difficulty to fit the supplied hose for the connection between the aux. tank and the main tank. The hose is only 4 inches long  and needed to be connected to the original filler pipe. As the connection is to close to the crossmember No. 7,  I could not get a proper seal on it and I ended up using my old rubber tank filler hose instead. The hose clamp – circled –  was a nightmare to tighten. Eventually I got this right too. I hate to think that one day I will have to replace the hose.

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Filler pipe from auxiliary tank to main tank. The small pipe is the vent pipe from main tank which is now connected near to the filler cap.

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Main tank with new protector. It is much easier to remove the exhaust to fit the tank in place. I could save myself a lot of time if I  had removed it before hand.

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Some modification needed on the tank inlet pipe for the extra breather hoses.

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The spare wheel is slightly lower to the ground.

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Auxiliary Tank – Underbody preperation

The underbody of my land Cruiser has definitely seen better days and I’m not surprised to see the fixing point rot away. In some other Country’s the Land Cruiser 100  is equipped with a auxiliary tank and the same fixing points are used. The bolt holes are unusable which ment I had to cut the rotten material away.

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This must be the cheapest available weld-on nut what Toyota’s money could buy. I’m not surprised the thread was not existent.

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To make a strong connection I used a mild steel box section which I have welded a nut inside and bolted on to the rear underfloor panel reinforcement. This should last a long time.

 

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Everything is painted with chassis Lack, connected and bolted up. Before fitting the tank I sprayed on some underbody and cavity wax.

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Next step is fitting the tank.

 

Auxiliary Tank – Preparation

Finally, I have completed the refurbishment of the main fuel tank and managed to fit the tank back in place. It took me far longer as I have anticipated. Now I want to fit the auxiliary tank from Frontrunner which are made in South Africa. Frontrunner claims the tank hold 62 litres which is more than sufficient for my purpose.

The tank is much smaller than the Long Ranger which is made in Australia and hold up to 182 litres. The advantage of the smaller tank is; it is much cheaper and I can place my spare wheel back under the LC as the original layout was.

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The tank came with all the fittings and painted. The paint job is probably good enough for South African roads but definitely not for Europe with all the rain and road salt in the winter.

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I rough sanded the surface, then I slapped a couple of coats zinc primer on and after ample trying time a generously amount of black chassis paint.

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Finally, I covered the surface with DINITROL 3125 HS wax which can be used for surfaces and cavities. This should prolong the life of the tank significantly.

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Land Cruiser 100 Fuel Tank

Since about 3 years I’m planning to remove my diesel tank on the Land Cruiser 100 but never came around  to do it. There was always something else more important.  Now when I have taken the fuel tank out I’m glad it is done and I hope it was not too late. I’m surprised the tank is not leaking as the condition is not good.

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The under tray or tank protector is so brittle it just has fallen appart when I have removed it. Definitely have to order a new one and new tank straps as well. Now I have to look where I get all the replacement parts.

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New Pedders springs installed on my Land cruiser

The other day when I had my head under the LC I noticed the left hand spring was broken.  Last year I installed new Pedders shock absorbers but never bothered to change the springs as well. The Pedders shocks are heavy duty but I’m not sure if this had anything to do with the broken spring. It seems to me not so long ago when I have installed the Old Man Emu springs but after I have checked the mileage on it, I discovered it was more then 50 000 miles. So they have not performed as badly as the LC is very often heavy laden and used offroad a lot.

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It did not took very long for a new set of Pedders (7845) extra heavy duty springs to arrive and with a pair of Urethane 20mm Coil Spring Insulator which fit perfectly to it.

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The Pedders springs are slightly higher than the OME’s and definitely stiffer but the diameter of the coil is still the same.

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It took a bit an effort to install the new springs as they not compress very well but eventually I have succeeded. Pedders claim this springs are suited for constantly loaded vehicles but I plan to install an auxiliary tank in the near future, this is not an issue for me as Io will have plenty extra weight on the rear axle.

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I hope the pedders coil springs perform so well as the OME’s. Only time will tell.

Continuous Battery Charger

The Land Cruiser 100 series alarm system continually consumes a lot of power, so when the car is not in use for some time, this drains the batteries.

I had an idea to connect the car on shore power, similar to the marine environment, when the LC is parked up at the front of the house.

I required a specialist charger of which I can permanently fit into the LC, which is also built for harsh environments, and needed to be waterproof.

I purchased a Blue Power IP67 Battery Charger from Victron Energy as it is an Adaptive 4-stage charger (bulk, absorption, float and storage) of which is also maintenance free. I also bought IP68 plugs for the connections.

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IP68 connector

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I added an extra connector to make bumper removal easier, when necessary.

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Blue Power IP67 Battery Charger, designed to charge batteries 14-225 Ah (including a Start Interrupt Function)

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A relay was added to prevent the car from starting whilst it is connected to power. This is an added bonus to prevent me driving off whilst connected.

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This is the layout of the charger on the right hand side of the Engine Bay.

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Connection on ARB front bumper.

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RCD (Residual Current Device) on wall of house.

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Voilà! Continuous charge!